Posts Tagged ‘incredulity’

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if you haven’t completed syntax II, do not read this.

July 8, 2010

LOWERING IS NOT OKAY.

This is prompted by my esteemed colleague, Devin, who posted an analysis here of some Chinese sentences that he’s collected on his current travels there. Mind you, even if I didn’t have this severe (and reasonable!) phobia of lowering, I’d still take issue with the whole “let’s just stick a T in some place that has nothing to do with X-Bar” shindig taking place in the last trees of his analysis.

What I’m trying to say here is, I am incapable of going more than two months without syntax. Apparently. I’m sitting in some college library right now, I do not even know what college (they’re thick on the ground in Saint Paul, for some reason), obsessing over this instead of having real adventures. I suppose it’s consolation to myself for losing my cellist. (Sad story. I’ll tell you later.)

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The Situation Has Failed to Resolve Itself.

February 11, 2010

I have done some thinking, and had some conversations with my father. He laughed at me, um, a LOT when I told him about my qualms about public/administrative figures following me on my public social networking device. He says it’s like standing on the street corner with my megaphone (I have a megaphone, by the way) and then getting mad when people I don’t like stop and listen to my inane rantings.

So, okay, I can accept that. I shall either stop whining, or lock my account so that I have a right to whine.

However! I still can’t accept @benladen’s banning. We’ve had confirmation (I’ll get back to this with links and screencaps) that it was really @mark_yudof’s office that reported Ben. We’ve had confirmation that Ben is not the only one to whom this has happened. I’ve read through Twitter’s Rules again, and the thing is, Twitter hasn’t officially said what Ben did wrong. The mechanism for contesting a suspension is essentially “Tell us what you think we think you did wrong and then tell us that we’re wrong about it.” This policy smells so much like a trap, and I can’t help but feel that @mark_yudof’s office knew this when they reported @benladen.

Ah, that is another thing. I have come to the conclusion that @mark_yudof and Mark Yudof are not entirely the same entity. The behavior on the account is too bizarre and erratic, and it only makes sense if both Mark Yudof the Person and Mark Yudof’s P.R. Staff are both using it. I hope I’m not wrong about this, because if I am the implications about Mark Yudof the Person are weird and unsettling.

Now, I’ve gone through what data we have and I’ve decided that while I remain hugely ambivalent towards Mark Yudof the Person (who can come to my party if he promises to warn me ahead of time and bring some good wine and not kick anyone out this time), I’ve got huge objections to @mark_yudof the Twitter Entity. That @mark_yudof, I intend to keep bugging, because that @mark_yudof is making the other one look bad. Worse. Whatever.
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Mark Yudof, go to someone else’s party.

February 1, 2010

So, I’m having a bit of a hard time with something, and I’ve been a little nervous about mentioning it in public because frankly it could well be slander depending on how I phrase it, and I just don’t know how diplomatic I want to be.

Thing is, Mark Yudof follows me on twitter.

That’s… well, that’s weird enough as it is. Yudof is the president of the University of California. I’ve never met or spoken to the man. I have occasionally sent him angry emails, because being a conscientious UC student requires one to send angry emails at one’s president once in a while. However, I certainly have no personal connection with him. And while I did use my Twitter for a short time while involved with the UC Occupations, I rarely tweet about anything that University administrators should be especially interested in.

My twitter is a personal thing, a toy, a microblog where I talk about what I ate for breakfast and how cool my Translation Theory class is and how I think that kid in my lit section is super cute. Mark Yudof does not need to know these things. I don’t want my dad’s boss showing up at my birthday party, and I don’t want my university president following me on twitter. Mark Yudof is, in fact, disinvited from the party that is my twitter.

But Kirby! You say. Why not just block him and continue blithely tweeting about porn and ice cream as you are wont? Well, the same reason I wouldn’t kick my dad’s boss out of my birthday party if he showed up: I don’t want him there, but I don’t want to get in trouble for kicking him out.

See, a friend of mine, @Benladen, just got suspended from twitter because Yudof decided that he didn’t like his tweets. (My dad’s boss just kicked my loud, drunk friend out of my party.) I do not think he had the right to do this. I do not think Yudof has the right to BE on twitter. But we can’t tell him to leave, because then he might kick US out. It’s not fair, and I feel invaded in what was a safe, fun place for my peers and me. If I want to get to know him, I will approach him myself. It’s inappropriate for him to try and get to know me in this way, because I feel so pressured and trapped.

I don’t follow him back. I don’t expect him to actually read most of my tweets. (Thank god.) But I’m very, very angry about the suspension of @Benladen, and I wish someone would convince Yudof that @mark_yudof has other, cooler parties to go to.

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You can’t spell Di(ego)

May 30, 2009

My good friend Diego was somewhat dismayed to hear that I had not yet written a blog post about him. He followed this expression of disappointment almost immediately by dragging me and Harry into the bathroom and locking us in.

Diego has recently undergone a tragic rejection, you see, and in his fits of trying to figure out why any girl would turn him down, he’s come to two simultaneous, contradictory (in my opinion) conclusions: 1. said girl is stupid because there’s definitely nothing wrong with him, and 2. he needs people to tell him how attractive he is to reassure him that there’s nothing wrong with him.

So he takes me and Harry into the bathroom because he needs the mirror. He makes us close our eyes while he arranges himself. (Harry eats parfait blindly, and I giggle like a loon.) When he lets us open our eyes, it is so that he can show us how good he looks shirtless. He needs the mirror to figure out how to flex, you see.

At this point I kind of lost it. I was laughing while I told him that, yes, he’s a very fit young man. I tried very hard not to tell him that maybe this girl didn’t want to date the sort of boy who has refined flexing in mirrors to an art form.

There’s no real point to this story, except that I have strange friends.

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I honestly can’t tell if they’re serious sometimes.

April 16, 2009

Today, while skimming one of the four emails we recieved from campus authorities about the upcoming naughtiness on 4-20, I paused and choked a little at this:

It is a common misperception that all college students drink alcohol and smoke a ton of weed. Our data continues to show that at UCSC, 30% of our students choose not to drink at all and 60% of our students report having never used marijuana.

It is not accurate to say that UCSC is a party school – perception is not reality, but certainly if you hang around with people who drink or use frequently, it will be your perception that EVERYONE is doing it.

I… what? What kind of polling methods are they using? Where the hell did they get that number? Have they ever been to Santa Cruz? Good lord. Maybe they just chose not to ask anyone from Porter or Kresge.